All posts tagged artists

I’m excited to announce that I have a piece in Dacia Gallery’s upcoming show, Emanation – a group portrait exhibition. The opening is this Thursday, June 12, 2014 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm. I’ll be at the opening, so stop by to check out some incredible artwork (seriously, these artists have some beautiful portraits) or to say hello!

Melissa Huang, Muhammad, 2013, oil on canvas, 20" x 20"

Melissa Huang, Muhammad, 2013, oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″

Check out the Facebook page for the opening here, or see the artist bios and included artworks here. The show runs from June 11, 2014 – July 6, 2014, so make sure you stop by the gallery to take a look!

53 Stanton Street, New York, NY 10002 – (917) 727-9383

Featured Artists:
Erin Anderson, Mary Bechtol, Taha Clayton, Bob Clyatt, Erin Fitzpatrick, Max Gleason, Melissa Huang, Katrina Majkut, and Raisa Nosova

EMANATION - Group Portrait Exhibition, Dacia Gallery

EMANATION – Group Portrait Exhibition, Dacia Gallery

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week we’ll look at a series of portraits by painter Annie Kevans:

Annie Kevans, Benito Mussolini, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Benito Mussolini, Italy, 2004, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Francisco Franco, Spain, 2004, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Francisco Franco, Spain, 2004, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, 2004, oil on canvas, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, 2004, oil on canvas, 51 x 41cm

As you may have noticed, Annie Kevans’ Boys series depicts the faces of real dictators as innocent children. Childlike features are exaggerated, creating rosy-cheeked, doe-eyed versions of violent dictators. Her images exist in stark contrast to what we know about these men.

For Kevans, accurately portraying people is not the focus of her portraits. She views her work as conceptual, and the rift between the accuracy of the portraits and what we know to be factually true adds to the concept.

Kevans is also well known for her series, Lost Boys, including portraits of now-grown child stars as they used to be. In this series the contrast is also important, as the viewer compares, say, and adult Michael Jackson with his younger self.

Stylistically, Kevans appears to be very similar to Karen Kilimnik with her loose painting techniques and flattened value planes, although the “celebrities” she selects exist in a very different vein. Kevans’ undefined brushstrokes only add to the jarring sense of innocence in these portraits.

Annie Kevans, Michael Jackson in Blue, 2009, oil on paper, 50 x 40cm

Annie Kevans, Michael Jackson in Blue, 2009, oil on paper, 50 x 40cm

You can see more of Kevans’ work here. Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Paintings by Feminist artist, Alice Neel.

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week we’ll look at a series of paintings by feminist artist Alice Neel:

Alice Neel, Ballet Dancer, 1950, oil on canvas, 20" x 42"

Alice Neel, Ballet Dancer, 1950, oil on canvas, 20″ x 42″

Alice Neel, John Perreault, 1972, oil on canvas, 38" x 63.5"

Alice Neel, John Perreault, 1972, oil on canvas, 38″ x 63.5″

Alice Neel, George Arce, 1959, oil on canvas, 36" x 25"

Alice Neel, George Arce, 1959, oil on canvas, 36″ x 25″

Alice Neel, T.B. Harlem, 1940, oil on canvas, 762 x 762 mm.

Alice Neel, T.B. Harlem, 1940, oil on canvas, 762 x 762 mm.

Alice Neel is one of my personal favorites. I find her work very inspiring, both for the content and for her technique. Over the past summer I interned with the Luce Foundation Center at the American Art Museum, and had the pleasure of seeing Neel’s Self Portrait every day in the adjacent hall of the National Portrait Gallery. A very impressive painting! Her thick lines and beautiful brushstrokes combined with her unique perspective on the human figure make her, in my opinion, one of the most notable painters of the 20th century.

I love the fact that Neel painted so many men. And not only that, she painted many men of color. In a world where art history classes are whitewashed and masculinized to such an extent, prominent artists like Neel remind me that work like this did exist (this is another opportunity to link to Medieval POC, a blog focusing on people of color in European art history. Gotta love the tag line, “Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate”)

And not only did Neel paint men, she painted sensual portraits of men. There is something undeniably elegant and sexual about her images of the ballet dancer or of John Perreault (see both above). The elongated limbs and the placement of the models so you see so much of their bodies, Neel’s portraits are unapologetically focused on serving the female gaze.

The fourth painting shown here, T.B. Harlem, is one of Neel’s most well-known work. This intimate portrait of her lover’s brother, Carlos Negrón, shows a young man of 24 suffering from tuberculosis. His bandaged chest comes from a thoracoplasty, a procedure in which doctors removed ribs in order to collapse and rest the TB infected lung. This portrait of Negrón elongates the figure, and reflects martyred Christ imagery.

This is far from all of Neel’s work. There are many more portraits of men and women, and I would recommend reading more about her life here. She led a fascinating existence.

You can see more of Neel’s work here. Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Erotic paintings by feminist artist, Joan Semmel.

RIT Fine Art Studio Celebration 2014

RIT Fine Art Studio Celebration 2014

Join the RIT Fine Arts Studio program in viewing student work from all levels: freshmen through graduate. Explore the studios, meet the artists, and discover new artwork! My studio will be open; please stop by and say hello!

Check out the Facebook page here.

Open to the public Thursday May 8, 2014 from 4:00 – 6:00 PM.

Rochester Institute of Technology
1 Lomb Memorial Dr, Rochester, NY 14623
Building 7
Booth A590 & Gannett A172 (In the basement! Head down the stairs and follow the signs)

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week we’ll look at a series of erotic paintings by feminist artist Joan Semmel:

Joan Semmel, Intimacy-Autonomy, 1974, oil on canvas, 50" x 98"

Joan Semmel, Intimacy-Autonomy, 1974, oil on canvas, 50″ x 98″

Joan Semmel, Erotic Yellow, 1971-1973, oil on canvas, 72" x 72"

Joan Semmel, Erotic Yellow, 1971-1973, oil on canvas, 72″ x 72″

Joan Semmel, Untitled, 1971, oil on canvas, 70" x 80"

Joan Semmel, Untitled, 1971, oil on canvas, 70″ x 80″

Joan Semmel, Flip-Flop, 1971, oil on canvas

Joan Semmel, Flip-Flop, 1971, oil on canvas

Feminist artist Joan Semmel created the first of the Erotic Series in the early 1970s. Her highly sexualized images depict men and women as equals, transforming their bodies into sensual landscapes. This series often focused on a lounging nude seen from the model’s point of view, effectively drawing the viewer into the image, while later paintings would take a more voyeuristic point of view.

As a first-wave feminist, Semmel worked to free the female nude from a patriarchal history. She said of her work, “My intention has been to subvert the tradition of the passive female nude”. Semmel does this well, addressing cultural obsessions with women’s youth and beauty through imagery including mannequins and self portraiture. Her nudes are equals, and are clearly far more than objects of the male gaze.

Semmel’s work is incredibly inspiring for a number of reasons, including her skillful use of color and composition, as well as her unique depiction of the male nude.

You can see more of Semmel’s work here. Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Sculptors Village by photographer Chiara Goia.

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s works are Cotton Candy and Sway by Jen Mann:

Jenn Mann, Cotton Candy, 2013, 48"x46", oil on canvas

Jenn Mann, Cotton Candy, 2013, 48″x46″, oil on canvas

Jenn Mann, Sway, 2013, 50"x50", oil on canvas

Jenn Mann, Sway, 2013, 50″x50″, oil on canvas

I first saw Mann’s work on tumblr, where her brightly colored, bubblegum-like portraits are incredibly popular. Her paintings are beautiful, with an intriguing use of monotone figures against contrasting backgrounds. She limits herself to simply composed portraits with very clean, crisp lines and naturalistically rendered features. These portraits are from her Strange Beauties series and are inspired by the circus, the innocence of childhood, and dreams.

You can see more of Jen Mann’s work here or take a look at her somewhat different Fera series here.

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Amy Sherald’s The Rabbit in the HatPony Boy, and High Yella Masterpiece: We Ain’t No Cotton Pickin’ Negroes.

Yeesookyung is a Korean artist living in Seoul, who is well known for her intricate and entrancing ceramic forms. Her sculptures are made of the shards and fragments of broken ceramics, carefully fit together like a jigsaw puzzle.

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2011, 76x64x68 cm

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2011, 76x64x68 cm

Yeesookyung created her Translated Vase series in 2002 after seeing ceramic master Lim Hang-Taek’s trash shimmering in the sunlight. She was attracted to the reflection of light on the shards and the organic forms their cracks created. Back in the studio, Yeesookyung takes the ceramic cast-aways and fits the pieces together until undulating, elegant forms emerge.

While originally, Yeesookyung had predetermined forms in mind, she soon let the materials guide her. Her pieces moved away from being quite so geometric and grew into forms she describes as “bumpy” and “stuttering”. The entire effect is enhanced by the beautiful gold she uses to fill in the cracks. Gold lacquer is not only beautiful, but a pun. In Korean the words “gold” and “crack” are both “geum”. In Yeesookyung’s words, “I wanted to add a sense of humor to my work by filling geums (cracks), which are considered as defects, with a valuable material, such as real geum (gold).

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2007, 43x45x49 cm, Courtesy of Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, USA

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2007, 43x45x49 cm, Courtesy of Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, USA

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2009, 80x85x170 cm, Oranienbaum, Dessau, Germany

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2009, 80x85x170 cm, Oranienbaum, Dessau, Germany

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2009, 84x81x122 cm, courtesy of Boston Museum of Contemporary Art, Boston, USA

Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, 2009, 84x81x122 cm, courtesy of Boston Museum of Contemporary Art, Boston, USA

Yeesookyung, Translated vase, installation scene, 2009, Vancouver Sculpture Biennale, Vancouver, Canada

Yeesookyung, Translated vase, installation scene, 2009, Vancouver Sculpture Biennale, Vancouver, Canada

These sculptures question the ceramic tradition in which perfection is key. According to the artist, “The master potter was trying to create the perfect piece each time, and he would discard even the ones with the slightest flaw. So I chose to create new forms from them, because perhaps, I don’t believe completely in that kind of perfection”.

Yeesookyung’s attention to detail translates to the other mediums she employs. For instance, her incredibly intricate flame paintings are created by laying paper on the ground, starting from one position and methodically moving from bottom to top. This is similar to the way in which she uses ceramic. Her flames are carefully fitted together; they and the vases grow organically. Read more →

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s paintings are Brian and Steve by Sasha Panyuta:

Sasha Panyuta, Brian, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 48"x60"

Sasha Panyuta, Brian, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 48″x60″

Sasha Panyuta, Steve, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 48"x60"

Sasha Panyuta, Steve, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 48″x60″

Panyuta is a Russia-born artist who lives and works in New York City. She creates acrylic works that are full of bright, unblended colors with figures against simple backgrounds. Panyuta’s portrait of Brian is interesting, in that it is part of a group of works depicting multimedia artist Brian Kenny. Kenny has a collection of portraits of him from fellow artists (that you can see here).

I first saw Panyuta’s paintings at 100 Artists Book (100 artists of the male figure). You can see Panyuta’s work on her site, and an interview here

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments.

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Elise Graham’s Untitled.

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s piece is “Untitled project” by Elise Graham:

Elise Graham, Untitled project

Elise Graham, Untitled project

I stumbled across Elise Graham on Fuck Yeah Female Artists (My new tumblr addiction. It’s INCREDIBLE). Graham works in a very strict format, with collages limited to few source materials, generally including black and white drawing, and sized 8.5″x11″. These works are framed and hung in grids. Graham refers to her collages as “Rearrangements that manufacture false realities” and enjoys the accessibility of the medium.

You can see more of Graham’s work on her website. Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Shizuka Yokomizo’s Dear Stranger. You may also enjoy this post on the famous collage artist Martha Rosler.

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s work is Dear Stranger by Shizuka Yokomizo:

Shizuka Yokomizo, Dear Stranger, 1998-2000

Shizuka Yokomizo, Dear Stranger, 1998-2000

Shizuka Yokomizo, Dear Stranger, 1998-2000

Shizuka Yokomizo, Dear Stranger, 1998-2000

Shizuka Yokomizo, Dear Stranger, 1998-2000

Shizuka Yokomizo, Dear Stranger, 1998-2000

Dear Stranger, I am an artist working on a photographic project which involves people I do not know…I would like to take a photograph of you standing in your front room from the street in the evening. A camera will be set outside the window on the street. If you do not mind being photographed, please stand in the room and look into the camera through the window for 10 minutes on __-__-__ (date and time)…I will take your picture and then leave…we will remain strangers to each other…If you do not want to get involved, please simply draw your curtains to show your refusal…I really hope to see you from the window.”

Shizuka Yokomizo’s work involves strangers working together. But unlike many artists exploring the relationship between artist and stranger (for example Sophie Calle and Willem Popelier) she gains the subject’s consent. Those photographed vary in gender, age, race, and many other factors. The only things they truly have in common are their living in ground-floor apartments (in many different cities) and the fact that they complied with the anonymous letters’ requests.

I’ve selected two of Yokomizo’s images featuring men. Yokomizo’s work is particularly interesting in that she did not select her subject and therefore knew nothing of their gender prior to the taking of the photo. The male subjects are also unaware of the artist’s gender, and therefore their poses are independent of the stereotypical relationships between men and women. The subjects and artists are both responsible for the final image in terms of how the subject poses and how the artist composes the shot.

Yokomizo’s images show the curiosity and defensiveness of her subjects in their poses and expressions. The figures look closed-off; fair enough for someone being photographed by a complete stranger!

You can see more of Yokomizo’s work on her personal website. Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Sylvia Sleigh’s At The Turkish Bath.