All posts tagged paintings

I submitted my studio space at Rochester Institute of Technology for Hyperallergic’s A View from the Easel back in early March, and they just posted it now! I’m already nostalgic for my RIT studio space and can’t wait to make a new one.

Check it out!

I have fifteen paintings on display at Warfield’s Restaurant in Clifton Springs! Stop by to check out my gold leaf panel paintings, including imagery of fruit, crystals, figurines, birds, and more.

Melissa Huang, Garden, 2014, Oil on panel and gold leaf, 6" x 6" (each)

Melissa Huang, Garden, 2014, Oil on panel and gold leaf, 6″ x 6″ (each)

Melissa Huang, Three birds, 2014 & 2013, Oil on panel and gold leaf, 6" x 6" (each)

Melissa Huang, Three birds, 2014 & 2013, Oil on panel and gold leaf, 6″ x 6″ (each)

Melissa Huang, Garden, 2014, Oil on panel and gold leaf, 6" x 6" (each)

Melissa Huang, Garden, 2014, Oil on panel and gold leaf, 6″ x 6″ (each)

Warfield’s is one of the best restaurants in the area, so definitely stop by for lunch or dinner! I can also confirm they have an incredible bakery with very, very delicious bread.

And of course, Warfield’s is immediately across the street from Main Street Arts, so make sure to stop by and see some artwork!

7 West Main Street
Clifton Springs, NY 14432

I’m excited to announce that I have a piece in Dacia Gallery’s upcoming show, Emanation – a group portrait exhibition. The opening is this Thursday, June 12, 2014 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm. I’ll be at the opening, so stop by to check out some incredible artwork (seriously, these artists have some beautiful portraits) or to say hello!

Melissa Huang, Muhammad, 2013, oil on canvas, 20" x 20"

Melissa Huang, Muhammad, 2013, oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″

Check out the Facebook page for the opening here, or see the artist bios and included artworks here. The show runs from June 11, 2014 – July 6, 2014, so make sure you stop by the gallery to take a look!

53 Stanton Street, New York, NY 10002 – (917) 727-9383

Featured Artists:
Erin Anderson, Mary Bechtol, Taha Clayton, Bob Clyatt, Erin Fitzpatrick, Max Gleason, Melissa Huang, Katrina Majkut, and Raisa Nosova

EMANATION - Group Portrait Exhibition, Dacia Gallery

EMANATION – Group Portrait Exhibition, Dacia Gallery

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week we’ll look at a series of portraits by painter Annie Kevans:

Annie Kevans, Benito Mussolini, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Benito Mussolini, Italy, 2004, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Francisco Franco, Spain, 2004, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Francisco Franco, Spain, 2004, oil on paper, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, 2004, oil on canvas, 51 x 41cm

Annie Kevans, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, 2004, oil on canvas, 51 x 41cm

As you may have noticed, Annie Kevans’ Boys series depicts the faces of real dictators as innocent children. Childlike features are exaggerated, creating rosy-cheeked, doe-eyed versions of violent dictators. Her images exist in stark contrast to what we know about these men.

For Kevans, accurately portraying people is not the focus of her portraits. She views her work as conceptual, and the rift between the accuracy of the portraits and what we know to be factually true adds to the concept.

Kevans is also well known for her series, Lost Boys, including portraits of now-grown child stars as they used to be. In this series the contrast is also important, as the viewer compares, say, and adult Michael Jackson with his younger self.

Stylistically, Kevans appears to be very similar to Karen Kilimnik with her loose painting techniques and flattened value planes, although the “celebrities” she selects exist in a very different vein. Kevans’ undefined brushstrokes only add to the jarring sense of innocence in these portraits.

Annie Kevans, Michael Jackson in Blue, 2009, oil on paper, 50 x 40cm

Annie Kevans, Michael Jackson in Blue, 2009, oil on paper, 50 x 40cm

You can see more of Kevans’ work here. Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Paintings by Feminist artist, Alice Neel.

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week we’ll look at a series of paintings by feminist artist Alice Neel:

Alice Neel, Ballet Dancer, 1950, oil on canvas, 20" x 42"

Alice Neel, Ballet Dancer, 1950, oil on canvas, 20″ x 42″

Alice Neel, John Perreault, 1972, oil on canvas, 38" x 63.5"

Alice Neel, John Perreault, 1972, oil on canvas, 38″ x 63.5″

Alice Neel, George Arce, 1959, oil on canvas, 36" x 25"

Alice Neel, George Arce, 1959, oil on canvas, 36″ x 25″

Alice Neel, T.B. Harlem, 1940, oil on canvas, 762 x 762 mm.

Alice Neel, T.B. Harlem, 1940, oil on canvas, 762 x 762 mm.

Alice Neel is one of my personal favorites. I find her work very inspiring, both for the content and for her technique. Over the past summer I interned with the Luce Foundation Center at the American Art Museum, and had the pleasure of seeing Neel’s Self Portrait every day in the adjacent hall of the National Portrait Gallery. A very impressive painting! Her thick lines and beautiful brushstrokes combined with her unique perspective on the human figure make her, in my opinion, one of the most notable painters of the 20th century.

I love the fact that Neel painted so many men. And not only that, she painted many men of color. In a world where art history classes are whitewashed and masculinized to such an extent, prominent artists like Neel remind me that work like this did exist (this is another opportunity to link to Medieval POC, a blog focusing on people of color in European art history. Gotta love the tag line, “Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate”)

And not only did Neel paint men, she painted sensual portraits of men. There is something undeniably elegant and sexual about her images of the ballet dancer or of John Perreault (see both above). The elongated limbs and the placement of the models so you see so much of their bodies, Neel’s portraits are unapologetically focused on serving the female gaze.

The fourth painting shown here, T.B. Harlem, is one of Neel’s most well-known work. This intimate portrait of her lover’s brother, Carlos Negrón, shows a young man of 24 suffering from tuberculosis. His bandaged chest comes from a thoracoplasty, a procedure in which doctors removed ribs in order to collapse and rest the TB infected lung. This portrait of Negrón elongates the figure, and reflects martyred Christ imagery.

This is far from all of Neel’s work. There are many more portraits of men and women, and I would recommend reading more about her life here. She led a fascinating existence.

You can see more of Neel’s work here. Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Erotic paintings by feminist artist, Joan Semmel.

New bird oil paintings! 6" x 6" on panel with gold leaf.

New bird oil paintings! 6″ x 6″ on panel with gold leaf. Three parrots and a bluejay.

Finally posting some new bird paintings! Parrots have been popular lately. They’re incredibly fun to paint with their bright feathers and intelligent expressions.

Of this bunch, the orange parrot is a commission, the upper right green parrot is my half of an art trade, and the bluejay is headed to an exhibit of small works (more on that soon!)

The lower left parrot is still available! This piece is titled “Green Parrot Beauty Shot” and is currently for sale in RIT’s Shop One² for $65.

Bird oil paintings. Parrots and a bluejay.

Me and my flock!

The goldfinch peeking out on the right is shown in progress, and was also made for an art trade. I’ll post some of the great art trades I’ve received soon! I’m lucky to be friends with so many talented artists.

Here are some new bird paintings! You’ll notice these are a little more detailed than some of the older ones with a decorative, leafy background. I’m happy with the way this series is developing.

Melissa Huang, Cardinal, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6" x 6"

Melissa Huang, Cardinal, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6″ x 6″

Melissa Huang, Cardinal, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6" x 6"

Melissa Huang, Cardinal, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6″ x 6″

Melissa Huang, Parrot in the Jungle, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6" x 6"

Melissa Huang, Parrot in a Tree, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6″ x 6″

Melissa Huang, Parrot in the Jungle, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6" x 6"

Melissa Huang, Parrot in a Tree, 2014, oil on board, gold leaf, 6″ x 6″

I created “Parrot in a Tree” as a donation to a silent auction for RESTORE (formerly Rape Crisis Service) and the V-Day International Spotlight campaign. RESTORE provides crisis intervention and support services to women, children, and men who are survivors of sexual assault and their significant others.

“Cardinal” is a commission for a person who saw my bird paintings in RIT’s Shop One² (a fine art and craft gallery representing RIT affiliated artists as well as my favorite place to buy birthday presents on campus). I have eight bird paintings on display at Shop One² at the moment. I’ll post pictures of the set up soon! It’s exciting to have work for sale in a physical location.

I have one more bird painting in the works (another commissioned piece!). As a reminder, if you’d like your own feathery friend you can commission a unique work of art through my Etsy store.

 

Over the past two weeks I started and finished a new oil painting that I’m very excited about! It’s different from many of my other pieces, in that it’s smaller, much more colorful, and non-figurative. This piece has a better use of sharp and soft focus than some of my previous works, and has marked differences in textures. The glossiness of the dog figurine really pops out from the speckled beads and the shiny pearls.

This piece is for sale! Contact me for the price.

Melissa Huang, Treasures, 2013, oil on canvas, 20"x20"

Melissa Huang, Treasures, 2013, oil on canvas, 20″x20″

I also have some shots of the work in process! Each photo was taken at the end of a painting session. I work pretty quickly, so there are a few big jumps, but you get the idea.

Read more →

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s works are Cotton Candy and Sway by Jen Mann:

Jenn Mann, Cotton Candy, 2013, 48"x46", oil on canvas

Jenn Mann, Cotton Candy, 2013, 48″x46″, oil on canvas

Jenn Mann, Sway, 2013, 50"x50", oil on canvas

Jenn Mann, Sway, 2013, 50″x50″, oil on canvas

I first saw Mann’s work on tumblr, where her brightly colored, bubblegum-like portraits are incredibly popular. Her paintings are beautiful, with an intriguing use of monotone figures against contrasting backgrounds. She limits herself to simply composed portraits with very clean, crisp lines and naturalistically rendered features. These portraits are from her Strange Beauties series and are inspired by the circus, the innocence of childhood, and dreams.

You can see more of Jen Mann’s work here or take a look at her somewhat different Fera series here.

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Amy Sherald’s The Rabbit in the HatPony Boy, and High Yella Masterpiece: We Ain’t No Cotton Pickin’ Negroes.

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s works are The Rabbit in the Hat, Pony Boy, and High Yella Masterpiece: We Ain’t No Cotton Pickin’ Negroes by painter Amy Sherald:

Amy Sherald, The Rabbit in the Hat, 2009, oil on canvas, 54"x43"

Amy Sherald, The Rabbit in the Hat, 2009, oil on canvas, 54″x43″

Amy Sherald, Pony Boy, 2008, oil on canvas, 54"x43"

Amy Sherald, Pony Boy, 2008, oil on canvas, 54″x43″

Amy Sherald, High Yella Masterpiece: We Ain't No Cotton Pickin' Negroes, 2011, oil on canvas, 59"x69"

Amy Sherald, High Yella Masterpiece: We Ain’t No Cotton Pickin’ Negroes, 2011, oil on canvas, 59″x69″

Amy Sherald’s paints portraits of black men and women in which she removes all color from their skin. In Sherald’s words,  her work “began as an exploration to exclude the idea of color as race from my paintings by removing “color” but still portraying racialised bodies as objects to be viewed through portraiture”. Her figures started out with fairytale-like details which constructed an alternate version of black history. From there, her work evolved to place black figures in environments like circuses, which more directly called out themes of blackness and racialisation.

Sherald’s work focuses on self-identity and constructed identities. She draws from her own experiences as one of the few black children in her private schools and how her identity was formed by those experiences.

I saw one of Sherald’s paintings at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and was struck by the sparing use of color and the flatness of certain portions of her paintings. If you ever have the chance to see her work, go! Her paintings are even more striking in person.

You can see more of Amy Sherald’s work here.

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Sasha Panyuta’s Bryan.